Biographical Sketches of Mennonite and Collegiant Revolutionaries in the Netherlands, 1780-1815

I’m planning more posts about the following politically significant figures, about whom little is known in the non-Dutch-reading world…

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Wybo Fijnje, Mennonite democratic revolutionary of the era of the French Revolution

Wybo Fijnje, Mennonite democratic revolutionary of the era of the French Revolution

I’m adding a space for a future profile of a significant figure in Dutch public life in the revolutionary era. Here’s a brief preview of a post I’m developing about Wybo Fijnje…

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François Adriaan van der Kemp

François Adriaan van der Kemp

Below is a pre-publication version of the following article:

Michael Driedger, “Kemp, Francis Adrian van der,” from The Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of the American Enlightenment, ed. Mark Spencer (2015).

  • NOTE: If you wish to cite the article, please make sure to consult the published version.

IMAGE SOURCE: The portrait I use at the start of the post is from the Luce Center at the New York Historical Society in New York City. Its reference number is 1922.5, and the caption that goes with the portrait reads: “The subject was born in Kampen, the Netherlands, the son of John and Anna (Leydekker) Van der Kemp. He was ordained a minister at Leyden in 1776. This portrait was painted at the request of some of his friends while he was in prison in Utrecht in 1787. Banished from Holland because of his controversial political views, he brought his family to America in 1788. The portrait descended through the family to his granddaughter, Pauline E. Henry, from whom it was acquired by the donor.”

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Maria Aletta Hulshoff

Maria Aletta Hulshoff

Maria Aletta Hulshoff, daughter of the significant Dutch philosopher and Mennonite preacher, Allard Hulshoff, was (like her father) an ardent support of democracy. among her writings was the Peace-republicans’ manual; or, The French constitution of 1793, and the Declaration of the rights of man and of citizens, according to the Moniteur of June 27th, 1793; in the original French, together with a translation in English (New York, 1817).

Title page of Hulshoff’s 1817 book.

Other sources in English include the following:

I will try to add to this post in the coming weeks.

“Mennonite Revolutionaries: An Oxymoron?”

“Mennonite Revolutionaries: An Oxymoron?”

On Friday, 1 March, I gave a public presentation at the Grace Mennonite Church in St. Catharines. My talk’s title was “Mennonite Revolutionaries: An Oxymoron? Examples from the Dutch Republic (1780-1810), and (Maybe?) Their Relevance for Today.” It was the second of four talks in a public discussion series called “Peace of Cake” (talks about peace church histories and ethics, plus continuing discussions afterwards over cake).

The handout I shared at the talk is this timeline…

I’ll add a few notes to the Dutch Dissenters Blog from time to time.

 

Thoughts about the SCSC Session: “New Approaches to the Radical Reformation”

Thoughts about the SCSC Session: “New Approaches to the Radical Reformation”

Below are a few bibliographical notes related to my contribution to the roundtable on 1 Nov. 2018 in Albuquerque, NM…

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Jacob Aertsz Colom, Dutch Mennonite Anticonfessionalism, and the Persistence of Dissent in the 17th Century

Jacob Aertsz Colom, Dutch Mennonite Anticonfessionalism, and the Persistence of Dissent in the 17th Century

The text below dates from 2013. It is the previous unpublished version of a paper I presented at the annual meeting of the Sixteenth Century Studies Conference in San Juan, Puerto Rico. At the moment there are no notes with the text. I plan to update the text to include at least a bibliography. The title of the paper I presented in San Juan is “Mennonite Printers, Anticonfessionalism, and the Persistence of Dissent in the Netherlands.” Except for updating the title for this post, I have only edited the text of the 2013 paper very lightly.

Part of the reason for publishing the 2013 paper as a blog post now is that my grad student, Brookelnn Cooper, is finishing off her MA research paper, and she is making the case for Colom as the printer / publisher of Menno Simons’ Blasphemy. For more about the Blasphemy, see my post about it here.

Image details coming soon…

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Heresy / Hairesy

Heresy / Hairesy

The theme of CBC Radio’s Podcast Playlist from 8 March 2018 is the cultural meaning of hair (“Long, Short, Straight, Curly: Podcasts about Every Type of Hair”). What do parts on the right versus the left mean? How are curls or straight hair related to political views? What about hair’s role in group and personal identity (e.g., Black and Jewish cultures of hair)? One purpose of this blog post is recommend this excellent episode of the show.

A second purpose is to gather and eventually add some further thoughts about the cultural meaning of hair in the study of early modern heresy and dissent. Gary Waite’s writing about visual depictions of wild heretics is part of my inspiration for the idea, as is my own recent far-too-long hair and experiments with a beard. For the former, see Gary Waite, “Naked Harlots or Devout Maidens? Images of Anabaptist Women in the Context of the Iconography of Witches in Europe, 1525–1650” in Sisters: Myth and Reality of Anabaptist, Mennonite, and Doopsgezind Women, ca 1525-1900 (2104).

This is a post-in-progress. Suggestions are welcome! Post them in the comments section of this webpage, or send them to @Mike_Driedger or @Amsterdamnified on Twitter. For more ideas, expand the post.

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New publications about Ana/baptist Münster

New publications about Ana/baptist Münster

NOTE: This post will focus on literature from approximately the last 10 years (i.e., since the publication of Bernhard Rothmann and the Reformation in Münster).

More literature is on the way. Stay tuned. (LAST UPDATED: 12 May 2018)

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Using Zotero

Using Zotero

This is a quick introduction to using Zotero, a bibliographic tool that is unique and powerful because it allows for individual and collaborative work. This is an early draft of a page that will eventually be available at the Amsterdamnified Project webpage. I’m making this draft for Gary Waite‘s graduate students at the University of New Brunswick at Fredericton, and for my students at Brock University. In other words, it’s main audience is intermediate-level university students. Suggestions for improving this page are welcome. Read more